Virtual Museum: Korean War


Those Who Served

Wayne T. Hogancamp

1st Lt. Wayne Hogancamp stands by his jeep, circa 1943, during his service in the South Pacific during World War II.

Wayne T. Hogancamp was born on Aug. 18, 1918, in Bardwell, Kentucky. He was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1940 prior to the bombing of Pearl Harbor. In 1942 he was selected for officer candidate school and received heavy machinery maintenance and artillery training. He then spent three months in Arizona on Africa desert maneuvers before being shipped to the South Pacific in 1943, where he served as an infantry cannon unit commander and executive officer. He spent the next two and a half years island hopping in the South Pacific with the Cannon Company, 305th Infantry, 77th Infantry Division. Hogancamp was awarded the Silver Star for his gallantry in action during a mission in Leyte, Philippines in January 1945, and the Bronze Star for heroic achievement during a military operation in the Kerama Islands in March 1945. He separated from the Army on Feb. 9, 1946. 

During the Korean War he re-enlisted and served from November 1950 to April 1951 as a training officer in Washington. After leaving the service, Hogancamp moved to Los Angeles, eventually settling in Gardena, where he worked as a tool and die maker and a business owner for 30 years. He and his wife Lillian had three children. Hogancamp died in his sleep on Nov. 3, 2012, at the age of 94.

Bernard Stein

Bernard Stein wearing his Air Cadet Wings during World War II.

Bernard Stein was born on June 6, 1921, in New York City. After completing his bachelor’s degree in accounting at New York University in 1942, he joined the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He attended pre-flight training at the Santa Ana Army Air Base. Due to a health issue, he was not deployed overseas. After World War II, Stein became a building contractor and developed homes in Queens, New York, but he wanted to return to military life. So he reenlisted in the U.S. Air Force and in 1950, and was stationed in England. 

During the Korean War, he was stationed in Okinawa, where he served as radar operator on the B-29 bomber “Command Decision,” named for the popular film about bombers during WWII. Stein’s B-29 bomber was the most-highly decorated bomb crew of the Korean War. They were called the “MIG Killers” for having shot down five Soviet-made MIG fighters during their bomb runs over North Korea. For his role in their successful missions, Stein received the Air Medal with 3 Oak Leaf Clusters. The nose art on their plane was Dopey and Doc, from Disney’s “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” flipping a coin. The fuselage of the plane is on display at the U.S. Air Force Museum at Wright-Paterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio. 

After Korea, Stein remained in the military and served as a navigator on B-47 bombers at various bases throughout the country as well as in Morocco. Upon his return to the states in 1962, he was assigned to the Atlas missile system at Forbes AFB in Kansas. He later became a base administrator at bases in Nebraska and Washington, until his retirement in 1967 at the rank of major. Stein was married to Iris Trueheart for 52 years until his death on Dec. 9, 2003. They are buried together at Arlington National Cemetery, and are survived by two sons. 

Uniforms & Medals

Correspondence

(Click thumbnail to view)

Letter from Lt. Wayne Hogancamp written to his wife on Oct. 26, 1945, while waiting to return home from occupied Japan after the conclusion of WWII. (Click to enlarge)

On the Battle Ground